Showing posts with label Butterfly Pea. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Butterfly Pea. Show all posts

Sunday, August 11, 2019

Growing Clitoria Ternatea and it's Benefits

August 11, 2019 0 Comments
Growing Clitoria Ternatea or Butterly Pea and it's Benefits

Clitoria Ternatea has a lot of names, it also called Blue Ternatea, Butterfly Pea, Asian Pigeon Wings, Blue Bell Vine, Blue Pea, Cordofan Pea and Darwin pea. It is an edible herbal plant that has a lot of benefits to our body. I've searched online for the benefits of Butterfly Pea and I was really amazed how this perennial plant have numerous benefits like memory enhancer, brain booster, improves eyesight, diuretic, analgesic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, anti-diabetic, anti-asthmatic, anti-anxiety and depression. I think there are a lot more benefits and medicinal use if you do an intensive research about this the Clitoria Ternatea.

After knowing its benefits, I wanted to have my own Butterfly Pea plant. I am just lucky because my friend gave me some seeds last summer and I planted it a big container. We made a DIY trellis made up of small water pipes and wires so the vines has more places to climb.

Growing Clitoria Ternatea plant is just easy, it doesn't require so much, just a good soil and you're good to go. I planted them through seeds in our compost soil and in more than a week or two, there are already new sprouts. After almost two months, it started to have flowers already. Once it has started growing flowers, it will grow more everyday. :)

I used organic fertilizer on my plants like:
  • Crushed eggshells - rich in calcium which helps plants grow healthy and strong. It also reduce the acidity of the soil.
  • Rabbit manure  - a great fertilizer is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus, nutrients that plants need for healthy growth. 
  • Banana peels - rich in potassium, phosphorus, and calcium. It also keeps the aphids away.
  • Rice water - (yung pinaghugasan ng bigas bago iluto). I actually don't know what are the actual benefits of using rice water on plants but based on experience, my plants and vegetables grows well and produce more fruits and as or the clitoria ternatea, it produces lots of flowers even some of my seedlings have started producing flowers in a month.
I've searched for the benefits or minerals our plants can get on rice water and I've found this post:
"Washing rice causes rice to lose up to 7% protein, 30% crude fiber, 15% free amino acids, 25% calcium (Ca), 47% total phosphorus (P), 47% iron (Fe), 11% zinc (Zn), 41% potassium (K), 59% thiamine, 26% riboflavin, and 60% niacin." [Source: http://www.christopherteh.com/blog/2017/11/washed-rice-water]

Clitoria Ternatea, Blue Ternatea, Butterfly Pea, Asian Pigeon Wings, Blue Bell Vine, Blue Pea, Cordofan Pea and Darwin pea

Today, it gives us a lot of flowers which is more than what we can consume. So, I give some to my friends and family and let them try it too. :) They were so eager to try it when they knew about its benefits. ;)

Clitoria Ternatea is commonly used as tea, some calls it Blue Tea as the natural color of it's flower will fade when boiled or put on a hot water. The tea doesn't taste that bad and you can make a refeshing juice when you add lemon or calamsi and honey on the exctract that you collected from the flower.
 Here's a reference of a study made on Clitoria Ternatea and it's beneits on its subject/s:
Clitoria ternatea , commonly known as Shankpushpi, is widely used in the traditional Indian system of medicine as a brain tonic and is believed to promote memory and intelligence. We examined the effectiveness of alcoholic extracts of aerial and root parts of C. ternatea at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses orally in rats in attenuating electroshock-induced amnesia. Extracts at 300 mg/kg dose produced significant memory retention, and the root parts were found to be more effective. [Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21214440]
Treatment with 100 mg/kg of Clitoria ternatea aqueous root extract (CTR), for 30 days in neonatal and young adult age groups of rat, significantly increased acetylcholine (ACh) content in their hippocampi as compared to age matched controls. Increase in ACh content in their hippocampus may be the neurochemical basis for their improved learning and memory. [Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12490229]
Evaluation of antiasthmatic activity of Clitoria ternatea L. roots. [Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21575696]